Spring Comes Early to the West Coast

Spring is here and I love seeing new flowers open everyday. Although we have had our share of sunshine and warmth its still very wet in the garden.
Spring comes early to the west coast

Its time for me to get out and weed under the rose arbor. This is where I meet my friend miss morning glory each week. There is something therapeutic about pulling her out by the roots. She never goes away completely. She has her roots planted just as firmly as I do in my garden. It’s like a struggle to see who will win. Right now the score is Morning glory 1- Kristin-0. Once she is weeded out this week I have all sorts of pollinating flowers to go in along the sides of this garden. I tend to use  annual plants here for colour. The last thing I need is weedy perennials.  It’s a good area to plant my Dahlia collection as well. I am trying to find a focal point for the back and hope to get the obelisk back to a center position.  It has to be something easy to move as mowing the lawn around garden objects drives hubby crazy. Should I paint the obelisk purple, yellow or blue?  Right now its a boring brown.

Spring comes early to the west coast

We live along a waterway and its fun to see whats in bloom in the back corner. It’s a bit of a wild area and that’s okay with me. The Kerria is in full bloom and loves it here. Its suckering habit should help hold the bank and slow erosion.

Spring comes early to the west coast

Salmonberry is native here and is opening up its flowers. I look forward to tasting the first berries. It grows naturally along our bank providing both food and shelter for the birds that frequent our garden.

Spring comes early to the west coast

Rosemary is in full bloom with its tiny blue flowers. Of all the herbs, this is the one I use most for cooking. I am trying to propagate new plants from this mother plant. Usually Rosemary succumbs to our wet winters and cold temperatures but the last two winters haven’t been too harsh. Rosemary can be gown from seed but germination rates are very low. Its best done from cuttings.

Spring comes early to the west coast

I used to think Rhododendrons were boring as they are planted everywhere in the Pacific Northwest. It wasn’t until I found out that they don’t grow as easily in other areas that I came to appreciate them more. Our garden is home to forty Rhododendrons and Azaleas. This one is a month early blooming. I love its colours but bought it mainly for its variegated leaves. Believe it or not, there wasn’t one variegated plant in this garden when we moved in. It was all green.

Spring comes early to the west coast

This has been the best spring yet for Camellia ‘Donation’. Can you believe the amount of flowers on this shrub? It started to bloom in late February and it’s still going strong.

Spring comes early to the west coast

Trees ands shrubs are starting to fill in along the back garden fence. With a walkway behind us, the shrubs provide the privacy we enjoy.

Spring comes early to the west coast

I have barely touched the garden outside except to pull back the mulch and pull a few weeds. I am busy this month in the greenhouse growing tomatoes. Yes, I am crazy for tomatoes and like to share them with others. I am at the point now that the greenhouse racks are so full that I have flats on the floor. I still have a long list of planting to do. With a plant sale to raise money for the food bank, I need to fit in a few more trays of seedlings. Lesson here is never buy a greenhouse that is too small. Mine is 8′ by 20′ and filled to the brim. I can’t wait to get all my flowers and veggies out into the garden. I am growing quite a few flowers that are new to my garden.

Spring comes early to the west coast

So have a wonderful Easter weekend. It’s the big Easter egg hunt here on Sunday. The joy of having a very large garden means there are many good hiding places.

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