Blog – That Bloomin' Garden https://www.thatbloomingarden.com Gardening is a way of life Mon, 19 Aug 2019 17:49:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 My Top Five Cut Flowers for 2019 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/08/my-top-five-cut-flowers-for-2019/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/08/my-top-five-cut-flowers-for-2019/#respond Mon, 19 Aug 2019 17:49:05 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17777 As August comes to a close I am trying to decide which flowers top the class in the garden. What…

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As August comes to a close I am trying to decide which flowers top the class in the garden. What worked and what didn’t? It’s good to think about it now. Did the flowers in the cutting garden meet your expectations? How long did they bloom? Were they good as a cut flower? I thought I would share my top picks for this season as they are plants I would grow again and again. It’s so hard to decide on just five but here they are.

My Top Five Cut Flowers for 2019

Move over Zinnias! My new love are China Asters. I love everything about them from flower form to its long lasting quality in a vase or arrangement. The only thing you need to remember is this flower starts to bloom at the end of July so it’s not an early bloomer. The aster above was grown from seed and is called Lady Coral Chamois. I have a mixed blend that are just about to open so it will be interesting to see which colours I get. I planted the second planting a bit late but it will be nice to have flowers into next month. Like zinnias, the asters hold their flowers for weeks. The netting you see in the photo is used to support the three foot stems from falling over. It’s much easier than trying to support each individual plant using stakes.

My Top Five Cut Flowers for 2019

Phlox Blushing Bride is still in bloom and hasn’t stopped producing flower buds since the end of May. This is one powerhouse plant. Each plant has flowers in varying shades of pinks and whites and is amazing in bouquets. Believe it or not there is Gomphrena in this bed which is being crowded out. The Phlox grows to about 24″ high but the spread is almost 36″ so it does need room to grow. Next year I will give it its own raised bed. I saw a  buttercream colour at the West Coast Seeds trial garden recently so I may try it next year.

My Top Five Cut Flowers for 2019

I grew this new introduction Zinnia Holi Scarlet from seed and although I don’t use red in the garden it’s become one of my new favourites. It grows to about 15″ high in our area so its great as a middle of the border annual. I grew Marigold Lemon Gem in front and it worked perfectly.

My Top Five Cut Flowers for 2019

I know I have talked about Zinnia Queeny Lime Orange in previous posts but its such a winner in the garden. This zinnia grows to about 3′ high and rarely needs deadheading. It’s a beautiful shade of peachy-orange and makes a wonderful cut flower for the vase.

My Top Five Cut Flowers for 2019

Dusty Miller New Look is a new plant from the All American Selection winners. It doesn’t have the more serrated leaves that previous cultivars have. I like the large broad leaves better. I wasn’t sure it would work well in flower arranging but it was excellent. I was able to insert the stems into wet foam quite easily. I will be removing Artemisia Silver Brocade and use Dusty Miller New Look instead. Yes, its an annual but it’s so easy to grow from seed. It germinates as tiny green seedlings but doesn’t get its silver colour until about the third set of leaves.

My Top Five Cut Flowers for 2019

So there you go, a few of my favourites from this year’s garden. Did you grow something new this year? I would love to hear about it. I have a garden full of large trees, shrubs and perennials but it’s the annual colour that really gives you long lasting impact.

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Amazing Flowers You Really Need to Grow! https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/07/amazing-flowers-you-really-need-to-grow/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/07/amazing-flowers-you-really-need-to-grow/#respond Fri, 19 Jul 2019 21:34:59 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17754 July has brought amazing flowers to our garden and you really need to try these new favourites of mine. It’s…

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July has brought amazing flowers to our garden and you really need to try these new favourites of mine.

Amazing Flowers You Really Need to Grow!

It’s been a wonderful year for growing a cutting garden. I have learned a lot along the way and will use that knowledge for years to come. I thought I would show a few of my favourite annuals that I started from seed this year. Above is Phlox Blushing Bride with its pretty pale pink and white flowers. Its growing almost too well and crowding out the Gomphrena planted next to it. I have been cutting this phlox for bouquets every week but should really do up some bouquets to sell. It grows to about 15″ high and has about the same spread. I have never had to deadhead this plant as it keeps sending up new buds continually. It can be grown in containers, raised beds or in the ground and likes a spot in full sun.

Amazing Flowers You Really Need to Grow!

As our daughter’s wedding approaches I am working on flowers to go on an archway. Above is my first attempt using Hydrangeas, Phlox, Skimmia and Artemesia. Today I will make one more as its hard to say if the Hydrangeas will still be in bloom three weeks from now. I love being able to use flowers from the garden for special events.

Amazing Flowers You Really Need to Grow!

I struggled to get Iberis umbellata to grow from seed. It’s best planted directly where you want it to grow. I planted the seeds outside in late April when the soil had warmed up. I think it may have been too warm for the seeds to germinate so I made sure to not let the soil dry out. That meant watering daily. I am happy to see this blush shade of Iberis or candytuft appear. It also comes in pure white and a light purple. Most brides love this blush colour so its a winner. It’s great used as a filler flower in a vase.

Amazing Flowers You Really Need to Grow!

Calendula Strawberry Blonde is finally in bloom after sulking in the garden for weeks. It’s July and I have only two plants with flowers along an eight foot row. Right next to these the ordinary orange Calendula are loaded with blooms. Sometimes we have issues with plants and their growth and there are no answers. I love the perfect symmetry of the petals on this flower. Nature is so amazing!

Amazing Flowers You Really Need to Grow!

I have flowers everywhere this year, in containers, raised beds and in the ground. Some of the plants I am growing are new for 2020. If you haven’t tried out the new line of Euphorbias from Proven Winners, you must. The dainty white flowers are a wonderful filler for containers as shown with Supertunia Bordeaux, another Proven Winners plant.

Amazing Flowers You Really Need to Grow!

When I first ordered my flowers seeds from Floret Farm I wasn’t sure what to expect. I am am vegetable grower and don’t normally grow so many annual flowers. After this years experience with flowers how can I not continue? Just look at the Amni above with its perfect spiral. Amni is commonly known as false Queen Anne’s lace. As this flower matures it will have tiny white flowers and the blooms will span up to 6″ across. This flower also dries well so you can use it all year round in crafts and bouquets.

Amazing Flowers You Really Need to Grow!Amaranth Love Lies Bleeding has grown by leaps and bounds since I last wrote. I cut one of the flowers last week and it measured almost 30″ long. I grew these plants from seed I saved a few years ago. Amaranth is a popular flower to use in bouquets as a spiller. It definitely adds some drama to a vase.

 

Amazing Flowers You Really Need to Grow!

Now the garden hasn’t been without pests this year. I wondered how things would be with no vegetables in the garden. I don’t have the usual vegetable pests like cabbage butterfly or carrot rust fly but aphids are a real problem across the lower mainland this year. This is a Zinnia stem covered in black aphids. Thankfully they seem to be under control now. I hosed them off the plants daily and removed stems that were too infested to be saved. With annual flowers you can cut them back and it helps encourage new growth. What really mystified me was the white bug near the aphids. Was it a good bug or a bad one? I posted this photo in a local garden group and it turns out this is a white ladybug larva. I haven’t seen one of these before but it’s a good bug and was chowing down on the aphids.

Do you grow your flowers from seed? I find there is way more selection when growing from seed. I am now starting seeds for fall flowers. Cool season flowers like snapdragons, violas and pansies can be started now and transplanted to the garden in September.

 

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Garden Bloggers Bloom Day-The Cutting Garden https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/06/garden-bloggers-bloom-day-the-cutting-garden/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/06/garden-bloggers-bloom-day-the-cutting-garden/#comments Sat, 15 Jun 2019 23:34:16 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17738 Today its Garden Bloggers Bloom day, a day when garden writers share what’s growing in their gardens. I’ve had a…

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Today its Garden Bloggers Bloom day, a day when garden writers share what’s growing in their gardens. I’ve had a busy spring since my daughter announced her engagement back in January. The wedding is in August so I am growing cut flowers in the raised beds that I normally fill with vegetables. I must say it’s a lot of fun doing something different. Since I grow all my annual flowers from seed that meant the greenhouse was packed to the brim from March until May. The best part was choosing the seeds. I ended up ordering seeds from Floret Flower Farm as they are the cut flower farmers best known in this area. It wasn’t until my daughter told me the wedding colour was blush that I cringed a little. Really, there isn’t a blush coloured flower that I know of but I am trying to get close to growing some. So being the crazy seed grower that I am I started a lot of different seeds. Let’s take a walk and I will show you some of my favourites so far.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day-The Cutting Garden

Amaranth or Love Lies Bleeding is one of my favourite annuals to grow. Its got drama written all over it with its tassel like flowers that grow to almost a foot long. When my daughter walked through the garden she insisted this is the flower she wants on her wedding arch. I have to tell you, this is not what I thought she would choose. I picked this one because I like it. It wasn’t part of the wedding plan.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day-The Cutting Garden

Say hello to Dianthus Dynasty White. This is an annual Dianthus so it will bloom all summer long. I love the hints of pink inside the petals. From a distance it looks pure white. There is a light fragrance to the flower but its not as scented as its perennial sisters.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day-The Cutting Garden

One of my favourites is Phlox Blushing Bride. This annual phlox is part of the Sweetheart Collection at Floret Farms. Its multi coloured petals make it a winner for wedding decor. It has shorter stems than I would like but we can still use it. This Phlox grows to about 16″ high.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day-The Cutting Garden

I love to grow Zinnias of all types and had a hard time choosing just a few. Above is Zinnia Mazurkia with its amazing white and rose petals. Talk about eye catching in the garden or vase. Its supposed to grow to 24″-36″ but it’s a young plant and only about 18″ high so far. This week I am pinching all the plants at 12″ high so I better get this variety done soon. I like to see the first bloom and then pinch.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day-The Cutting Garden

Zinnia scabiosa Zinderella Lilac surprised me this month as I expected it to be more of a lilac colour. It’s a pale pink and lovely for a blush themed wedding. Zinnias flower from June to September and hold their flowers for a long time before you need to deadhead.

That’s it for todays favourite flowers in the garden. I am excited to be doing wedding flowers this year. Be sure to visit May Dreams Gardens to see what everyone else has in their gardens this month.

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All You Need to Know About Growing Tomatoes This Spring https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/04/all-you-need-to-know-about-growing-tomatoes-this-spring/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/04/all-you-need-to-know-about-growing-tomatoes-this-spring/#comments Sun, 28 Apr 2019 23:36:03 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17714 I get a lot of questions about tomatoes so here are a few things you need to know to get…

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All You Need to Know About Growing Tomatoes This Spring

I get a lot of questions about tomatoes so here are a few things you need to know to get started. Before buying your plants think about what you will be doing with your tomatoes. Will you be eating them fresh, canning or cooking with them? Do you like a sweet or slightly acidic tomato? Are you growing in containers or in the ground? Answering these questions narrows down your choices. In my opinion all tomatoes can be eaten fresh. Some are juicier than others. Paste or Roma tomatoes are meaty and often don’t contain the juices most tomatoes have. Of course, there are a few Roma tomatoes that are both juicy and good for sauce. It’s important to try new ones each year to see what they are like. 

All You Need to Know About Growing Tomatoes This Spring

If growing in containers it will be easier to use dwarf tomato plants. Growing in the ground or in raised beds allows you to grow any size tomato plant. There are two types of tomatoes, determinate and indeterminate. Determinate tomato plants grow to a predetermined height and will produce all their fruit over a short period of time. Indeterminate plants will continue to grow and produce fruit all season long. Some indeterminate plants can grow very tall and all require staking for support. Never judge a tomato by its size. Some seedlings will look small and it may be that they are dwarf or shorter plants at maturity. Seedlings of beefsteak tomatoes are often larger plants. Look for healthy plants with green leaves, no yellow ones. Read the plant label before you buy so you aren’t disappointed. 

All You Need to Know about Growing Tomatoes This Spring

Hardening off your tomato plants is so important! I usually start the hardening off process towards the end of April. Day 1- I take my plants outside and leave them in a shaded area for one hour. Day 2-I bring the plants outside for two hours in the shade and back inside. Day 3-I bring the plants outside for three hours and they may get a bit of sun. Day 4-I bring the plants back outside and give them two hours of shade and two hours of sun. Day 5-I bring the plants outside for almost five hours of sun. Day 6- I bring the plants outside and they spend the day outside. Day 7-The plants come outside for good but will be covered at night with plastic over the shelf. If everything goes okay I will start leaving the plastic off the plants unless it rains. Before I let these plants get adopted I want them to be in the best shape possible. 

Taking care of your plants is easy once they are planted. The biggest mistake gardeners make is planting too early. Tomato plants do best when the night time temperatures are consistently 9-10C.  When planting your tomato plants plant them a bit deeper so that part of the stem is under the ground. The plant will form roots along the stem and the plant becomes stronger.

Water your new plants in well and check the soil every couple of days by doing the finger test. Insert your finger up to your knuckle into the soil. Is it cool and damp? Then no watering is needed. Is it dry? It’s time to water. Water deeply so your plants have to dig down deep for water. Never water your tomato plants with overhead sprinklers. Drip irrigation or hand watering is best as you can aim the hose wand at soil level where it’s needed.

All You Need to Know About Growing Tomatoes This Spring

Here in Vancouver it’s best to grow your tomatoes under plastic or a roof like structure. This helps to prevent diseases like late blight from infecting your plants. Once tomato plants have blight they need to be removed.

Feeding of your tomato plants starts from the beginning. Add some organic fertilizer to your soil before planting and supplement with fish fertilizer during the growing season. There are lots of fertilizer choices on the market but honestly if you use a slow release organic fertilizer at planting you probably don’t need anything else.

If you are looking for tomato plants I have my plant sale on May 4 from 9:00am-12:00pm. I like to grow heirloom tomatoes that have flavour. Many tomatoes come with interesting stories which makes growing them more fun. I tend to grow open pollinated tomatoes as I want to save seeds that are hard to find at retail stores. You will see a few hybrid tomatoes that I am trying out this year for the first time.

All You Need to Know about Growing Tomatoes This Spring

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How to Grow Potatoes for the Home Gardener https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/03/how-to-grow-potatoes-for-the-home-gardener/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/03/how-to-grow-potatoes-for-the-home-gardener/#respond Tue, 19 Mar 2019 16:06:19 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17686 Growing potatoes in the home garden is probably one of the easiest vegetables to start with if you are a…

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How to Grow Potatoes for the Home Gardener

Growing potatoes in the home garden is probably one of the easiest vegetables to start with if you are a beginner gardener. With the threat of frost behind us it’s time to shop for certified seed potatoes at your local garden centre. The hardest part will be deciding on which ones to grow. There are so many choices from Red Chieftain, Russet, Yukon Gold, Banana Fingerlings and more, it’s worth trying some of each if you have the room. There s nothing better than harvesting the first potatoes for dinner.

How to Grow Potatoes for the Home Gardener

Potatoes can be grown in the ground, in raised beds or containers. Potatoes like a fertile soil so add compost or well aged manure to your garden before planting. If growing them in the ground prepare your soil by digging a trench for the potato seeds. Select potatoes with at least two growing eyes on them. This is the beginning of new growth waiting to happen. Place your potatoes in the trench about 12″ apart and cover with several inches of soil making sure the potatoes are well covered. As the potato grows hill more soil around the plants making sure that there are leaves above the soil line. All the new potatoes are formed above the seed potato and will continue to form as you add layers of soil. You would use the trenching technique in raised beds as well. In containers I add a few inches of soil, add a few potato seeds and cover them. As they grow I will continue to add soil until the container is full. Potatoes need medium watering during the growing period.

How to Grow Potatoes for the Home Gardener

As the potatoes emerge through the soil they should look like the photo above. Remember when planting potatoes that they shouldn’t be planted where you grew tomatoes, peppers or eggplant the previous year. You need to practice good crop rotation to prevent pest and disease problems.

How to Grow Potatoes for the Home Gardener

Continue to water your plants until you see the foliage die back like it is above. Withdraw watering when you see that your plant has finished flowering and is starting to flop over. At this point the plant is sending its resources to tuber production. This is a sign that you can feel around under the soil to see how your potatoes are sizing up. It usually takes about seven weeks for potatoes to mature from when the plants break ground.

How to Grow Potatoes for the Home Gardener

You can even remove a few small baby potatoes as a treat for dinner. When harvesting try to dig about a foot away from plant to avoid damaging the tubers. This will loosen the soil and you can lift the whole plant out of the ground. Involve your children in the harvest as it’s like digging for gold. They get so excited and will do all the harvesting for you. Store your potatoes unwashed on trays in a cool garage and cover them to keep them from going green.

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March Brings Warmer Temperatures in the Garden https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/03/march-brings-warmer-temperatures-in-the-garden/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/03/march-brings-warmer-temperatures-in-the-garden/#respond Mon, 04 Mar 2019 22:28:45 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17673 March has finally brought us some better weather with night time lows above 0C. I know, its about time. Now…

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March has finally brought us some better weather with night time lows above 0C. I know, its about time. Now we can get started on our spring garden plans.

March Brings Warmer Temperatures in the Garden

Pruning Shrubs and Trees:

Because February was a very cold and snowy month many of us may not have pruned our summer flowering shrubs yet. It’s time to think about pruning your Hydrangeas, Buddleia, Clematis, Roses, Wisteria and Trumpet Vine. These are your summer blooming shrubs so you need to prune now. For spring flowering shrubs such as Spirea and early Clematis don’t prune them back until after flowering. Clematis that bloom from June to September can be pruned back now.

March Brings Warmer Temperatures in the Garden

Starting Seeds:

Now is the time to start tomato and pepper seeds indoors for transplanting outside from mid to late May. You may see plants in the garden centres but refrain from buying them too early. Temperatures at night need to be around 9C consistently for your tomato plants to do well. Peppers can go outside in mid May once we have a bit more warmth. Wait until April to start fast growing vegetables such as cucumbers, beans and squash inside. Plants like cucumber, squash and beans love to be direct sown outside in early June. By direct sowing the seed grows easily and doesn’t suffer transplant shock that seedlings may experience.

March Brings Warmer Temperatures in the Garden

Clean Your Tools:

Have you cleaned your garden tools yet? If not, this is a good time to give them a scrub using a wire brush to remove any soil. Be sure to oil them to get the joints moving again. If they need sharpening have it done by a professional if you are not sure how to do it yourself. It’s also time to drop the lawnmower blade off for sharpening.

Lawn Care:

Don’t mow your lawn yet, it’s too early. You can start a good maintenance routine now by adding lime and aerating your lawn towards the end of March. You won’t need to fertilize or over seed until April.

March Brings Warmer Temperatures in the Garden

In the Flower Garden:

In the flower garden cut back stems left standing from last fall and compost them. Carefully remove some leaf cover so tiny bulbs such as Crocus can grow. If you see some winter damage don’t be surprised as it often take a few months to show up. I expect to see some browning on rosemary again this year. Prune away any winter damaged branches to promote new growth. With spring arriving late you may feel overwhelmed with everything to do in the garden. Take a moment to enjoy the garden and if you can’t get it done, relax. The garden will grow even if you don’t tend it. Nature has a way of taking care of itself.

March Brings Warmer Temperatures in the Garden

Amending Your Soil:

Do you need soil every year? If you left the leaves on your garden you have already added nutrients to your existing soil. If your soil was left bare the rain could have washed away much of your topsoil. Get a soil test done before you add any nutrients to the soil. It’s been found that our soils are extremely high in phosphates. Its not recommended to use bone meal any more. Too much phosphate and it ends up in the groundwater and our streams and is harmful to marine life. If you are buying soil at the garden centre, ask them what’s in it. How much organic matter does it contain? Where does it come from? Has it got food waste in it? The best soil we have used came from West Creek Farms in Langley. If your gardens are still frozen sit back and relax, enjoy a seed catalogue, order seeds and plants and  plan your soil delivery. Although we often complain about winter and how long it is spring brings much to do all at once. I know by fall I will be glad to put my feet up once again.

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Starting Your Spring Vegetable Garden https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/02/starting-your-spring-vegetable-garden/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/02/starting-your-spring-vegetable-garden/#respond Tue, 19 Feb 2019 16:35:16 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17657 It’s almost March and time to think about planting some cool season crops inside the home or in the greenhouse.…

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It’s almost March and time to think about planting some cool season crops inside the home or in the greenhouse. Why cool season crops first? That’s because these plants don’t mind being planted out in early April. If you are growing from seed it’s best to start your seeds about six weeks before they go outside. With the heavy snowfall we had in February the ground will be quite saturated and may not warm up in March. I like to use a soil thermometer to see how warm the soil is before planting.

Starting Your Spring Vegetable Garden

Before you start your seeds grab a calendar and count back six weeks from your last frost date to see when you should get started. Here in Delta, BC our last frost date is around the end of March. That means I can start planning for cool season crops to go outside after that date. Note, there are only a few cold hardy crops that can be planted outside in March. Some crops can go outside early but some have to wait. It’s important to plant when conditions are right for the plant as that’s how you will become a successful gardener.

Here is a list of vegetables to start now:

March-Outside plant arugula, broad beans, corn salad, cress, kale & collards, pac choi, mustard, peas, radishes and spinach. Plant parsnips mid month. Sow asparagus, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, fennel, leeks, lettuce. Indoors plant tomatoes and broccoli.

Starting Your Spring Vegetable Garden

Remember if the soil is too cold and wet, your seeds if planted directly in the soil may not germinate. With our cool wet springs it’s definitely worth it to start some plants from seed inside or buy them from the garden centre to get a head start on the garden. Peas are a popular plant to start in the first week of March.

Starting Your Spring Vegetable Garden

If you think a cold spell is forecast and your plants may be affected, use a floating row cover over them to protect them. Floating row covers are an organic gardeners best tool. Not only do they keep our plants protected from the cold they also prevent pests from laying eggs on our seedlings. Floating row covers can be purchased at most garden centres. Place them over your seedlings but leave them loose in the centre to allow for plants to grow. Hold them in place with bricks, rocks or landscape pins.

Starting Your Spring Vegetable Garden

Always start your seeds in seed starter mix as it contains no soil and is free from pests and disease. Never use garden soil to start your seeds inside. Yes, it does cost more but I would rather have healthy seedlings so it does pay off. Use clean containers with drainage holes to start your seeds. You can use milk jugs, yogurt containers, plastic pots and newspaper pots as long as they drain freely and are clean.

Plant just enough seeds to feed your family. If you are not sure how much to plant the Garden Gate has a handy chart for how much to plant for a family of four. 

Starting Your Spring Vegetable Garden

Be sure to use clean pots that have drainage holes to start your seeds. Seeds like a warm spot inside the home near a good light source. If your home doesn’t have strong enough lights you may need to buy a lighting system to keep your seedlings from  getting too leggy. Be sure to read the directions on the seed package before planting. Some seeds need light to germinate and are often placed on the soil surface. Other seeds need darkness to germinate so are planted deeper into the soil. Space your seeds apart so the plants will be easy to remove when they need to be potted up. Once a plant has a second set of leaves potting up begins. This is necessary for plant root growth and you will need to start fertilizing your seedlings with a mild fertilizer after potting up. Most of my potting up is spent lifting tiny seedlings out of their first container and transplanting them to 4″ pots filled with a good potting soil. The plants can stay in 4″ pots until its time for them to go in the garden.

Final Tips:

1.Choose seeds your family will eat

2.Plant cool season crops first.

3. Make sure your plants get enough light and water. Too much water can be deadly to young seedlings so water when soil surface is a light colour.

4. Try easy seeds first like peas, lettuce, radishes and kale.

5. Always use clean containers with drainage holes.

If you have a gardening question leave a comment below or join us over on Facebook at That Bloomin’ Garden where we talk about what’s happening in our garden.

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It’s Time for Ladner Seedy Saturday and Garden Expo 2019! https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/02/its-time-for-ladner-seedy-saturday-and-garden-expo-2019/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/02/its-time-for-ladner-seedy-saturday-and-garden-expo-2019/#respond Fri, 15 Feb 2019 20:57:40 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17643 It’s almost time for Ladner Seedy Saturday, a fundraiser for the Ladner community Garden. So what is a Seedy Saturday…

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It's Time for Ladner Seedy Saturday and Garden Expo 2019!It’s almost time for Ladner Seedy Saturday, a fundraiser for the Ladner community Garden. So what is a Seedy Saturday event? Seedy Saturdays are held to celebrate seeds and to welcome the upcoming garden season. Seedy Saturdays focus on promoting seed sustainability, the growing of open pollinated seeds and saving  seeds for future generations. Saving seeds has gone back for generations before large agricultural corporations existed. Families would grow a favourite fruit or vegetable and save seed from them to be grown from year to year. To this day some farmers still save seed but those numbers are dwindling. The home gardener often saves seed from their favourite plants but many choose to buy seed these days. In order to preserve heirloom varieties it’s up to us to grow out these plants for future generations.

It's Time for Ladner Seedy Saturday and Garden Expo 2019!

What we have to remember is some of the seed we buy is hybrid seed so it doesn’t come back true each year. You need to choose open pollinated seeds to have the same plant year after year. Seeds that are marked OP on the package signify that you can collect seed from them at the end of the season. If the seed package says hybrid, F1 or F2 it means the seed has been developed from two different parent plants. If you collect seed from a hybrid you will most likely get the more dominant traits in the next generation. Mind you if you continue to grow out hybrid seed, you may develop a plant you really love.

It's Time for Ladner Seedy Saturday and Garden Expo 2019!

At most Seedy Saturdays there is a seed swap where you can bring in your leftover seeds to trade. Perhaps you grew leeks last year but your family didn’t like them. Bring the seeds in a small envelope to Ladner Seedy Saturday to trade for something else. it’s just that easy. It’s a great way to try something new and share seed stories with other gardeners. This year we have flower, vegetable and herb seeds to trade. Many people ask to buy our seeds but if we do that we often run out of seeds to trade.

At Ladner Seedy Saturday there will be two wonderful garden speakers. Amanda Jarrett comes on stage first with her presentation on how to grow vegetables in containers. She will be planting up a container of vegetables for all to see. If you live in a small space and think you don’t have room for vegetables, this is the talk for you. I will be speaking in the afternoon about herbs and how easy they are to grow and use in the kitchen. Every garden big or small should grow herbs to attract pollinating insects. Amanda speaks at 10:30am and I will be speaking at 1:00pm.

It's Time for Ladner Seedy Saturday and Garden Expo 2019!

Ladner Seedy Saturday has vendors in the big hall selling everything from fresh vegetables, eggs, seeds and plants. The speakers will be presenting in the sanctuary. Admission is by donation to support the Ladner Community Garden. The community garden grows food to be used for different charities so its a worthwhile cause.

Ladner Seedy Saturday is being held at the All Saints Anglican Church located at 4755 Arthur drive in Delta. The event runs from 10:00am-3:00pm. There is lots of parking and the event is within walking distance of the historic village of Ladner where you will find quaint shops and places to eat.

 

 

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Planning for a Cut Flower Garden https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/01/planning-for-a-cut-flower-garden/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/01/planning-for-a-cut-flower-garden/#comments Wed, 30 Jan 2019 21:10:55 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17620 This year my garden is going to be completely different. Most of you know from previous posts that I am…

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Planning for a Cut Flower Garden

This year my garden is going to be completely different. Most of you know from previous posts that I am an avid vegetable gardener. This year I will be growing a cut flower garden in the raised beds of the kitchen garden. In August our daughter is getting married! Yes, we are so excited and there is so much to do.

Planning for a Cut Flower Garden

I will be growing  flowers to place on the tables and in large planters at the wedding. A florist will prepare the bouquets and boutonnieres for the wedding party. I don’t need that stress as it’s hours of work to make bouquets.

Planning for a Cut Flower Garden

I am also growing some flowers for two other weddings, yes I will be busy but I love flowers. Who doesn’t? So how do I get started? First it’s time to get a soil test done and see what amendments I may need to add to the soil. I am also reading some wonderful books on cutting gardens. One of them has been written by Floret Farms and it’s called Cut Flower Garden and the other by Sarah Raven is called The Cutting Garden. It’s important to read these books to get a sense of how planting should be done, how the plants need to be grown and how to condition them for a vase.

Planning for a Cut Flower Garden

You can’t plant just anywhere, you need to take into account the size of the plant, its branching habit and the way it forms its flowers. For example, plants like Cosmos tend to branch out and take up about 18″ of space whereas Snapdragons grow straight up and are narrower. It’s important to know spacing when planting so your flowers don’t get damaged. I have done a garden plan and I think it will work. The taller plants are at the back of each bed so they don’t shade the other flowers.

Another thing to think about is a support system for your flowers. We have all seen our flowers do a face plant on the ground due to rain or wind. If you are growing for cut flowers a support system of stakes, trellising or netting will be needed. I will be on the hunt for a six inch square netting to support the stems of the flowers. It has to be adjustable so I can lift it up as the flowers grow.

Planning for a Cut Flower Garden

It’s not only cut flowers that you will need to make arrangements. Much of an arrangement is foliage and if you have shrubs in your garden they may be just the plant you need. The trend in weddings this year seem to be using more foliage than flowers. I will be growing Eucalyptus for the first time as the bride has requested it. You can also use greenery from the garden. You can choose to use cedar and mix it with eucalyptus or even grab some willow or ninebark branches. Its best to try a few things out ahead of the wedding to get the brides approval.

Once again the blush colour is still popular with brides so I have ordered the Sweetheart Collection of seeds from Floret Farms. Blush is a light pink with beige undertones and there aren’t a lot of flowers to choose from. I will grow a lot of white flowers to be used as fillers and add colour as needed. The roses will have to be ordered in from another country as they are out of season in August. July and August are tough months for flowers as the warm summer days take their toll on them. It’s the annuals that are the stars of the summer garden and are used for weddings.

Here is the list of flowers I am starting in the greenhouse for the new cutting garden:

Zinnia ‘Zinderella Lilac’- Double blooms with a mix of blush and lavender.

Dusty Miller-This hardy annual will give us some silver foliage for the wedding wreaths and garlands.

Amni ‘Green Mist’- A nice filler but I know there is a chocolate Amni out there so I am looking for it.

Globe Amaranth ‘Pastel Mix’- A mix of white, soft pink, rose and lilac these button-shaped flowers can be used fresh or dried.

Cosmos ‘Double Click Mix’- One of my favourites is this double petalled flower in rose, pink and white.

Phlox ‘Blushing Bride’-Clusters of flowers with a warm pink flush on white petals.

China Aster ‘Lady Coral Chamois’-Has peachy blush flowers on long stems.

China Aster ‘Giant Perfection Mix’- A mix of crimson, pink, peach, rose, white and purple annual flowers to 4″ across.

Calendula ‘Zeolights’- Apricot peach flowers with a dark centre.

Gypsophila or baby’s breath-Known as a filler in bouquets this tiny white flower needs no introduction.

Scabiosa ‘Imperial Blend’-An annual flower in pink, white, rose, lavender and maroon.

Zinnia ‘Queeny Lime Orange’- An AAS winner and a lovely peachy coloured flower growing to 36″.

Calendula ‘Strawberry Blonde’-Antique pink and yellow petals on this edible flower.

Candytuft ‘Fairyland Dwarf Mix’- Filler flower in shades of pink, white, red and lavender.

Zinnia ‘Envy’- The green flowers on this plant are perfect for bouquets.

Zinnia ‘Mazurkia’- A bicolour zinnia with red petals tipped in cream.

Salvia ‘Queen Mix’-Rosy pink and violet flowers. Perennial so it may not bloom in the first year.

Eucalyptus ‘Silver Dollar Tree’-Easy to grow and will be used in garland and wreaths.

Amaranth  or Love Lies Bleeding- If you want drama in the garden this annual is for you. Cascades of rose coloured flowers hang down creating a dramatic effect.

Celosia-This annual can’t be beat. Not only can it be used fresh or dried, it is loved by bees. Rose, pink and white spiky blooms on this Celosia.

Snapdragon Mix-Easy annual in a mix of colours. One of the first seeds to be planted in early spring so may need to do successive plantings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It’s Garden Show Ticket Giveaway Time! https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/01/its-garden-show-ticket-giveaway-time/ https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/2019/01/its-garden-show-ticket-giveaway-time/#respond Wed, 23 Jan 2019 18:17:23 +0000 https://www.thatbloomingarden.com/?p=17622 It’s that time of year when gardeners can’t wait to get in the garden. January is a great month to…

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It's Garden Show Ticket Giveaway Time!

It’s that time of year when gardeners can’t wait to get in the garden. January is a great month to start planing your garden, sketching out new gardens and buying seeds. It’s also a good time to attend one of the best garden shows on the west coast.

It's Garden Show Ticket Giveaway Time!

Yes, today I want to give away two tickets to the Northwest Flower and Garden Festival in Seattle. The garden festival runs from Wednesday, February 20,2019- Sunday, February 24, 2019. Each ticket is good for one admission.

So how do you win the tickets? Hop on over to my Facebook page at That Bloomin’ Garden , like my page and comment on the pinned giveaway post at the top of my That Bloomin’ Garden Facebook page. Let me know what kind of gardening you do or where you are from. If you have a garden question just ask. As a master gardener I like to help people with their garden questions.

It's Garden Show Ticket Giveaway Time!

I will be speaking at the Northwest Flower and Garden Festival on Thursday,February 21 at 10:00am on Veggie Gardening 201-Digging Deeper into the Patch. I will talk about vegetable gardening with some tips that have worked for me over the years. I will also be on the do-it-yourself stage on Friday, February 22  at 5:00pm showing you how easy it is to grow a beautiful garden from seed. Most of you already know I love seeds. Watching my plants grow from seed to harvest is so rewarding. Each one I grow is special to me.

It's Garden Show Ticket Giveaway Time!

The garden festival is full of things to see and it will feel like spring as soon as you walk in the door. From the elegant displays of gardens to the unique container plantings on the bridge, there is something for everyone to see.  The market place has hundreds of vendors  and I am always looking for new ideas for the garden. The seminars are held downstairs away from the crowds with  garden speakers to entertain and educate you.

Deadline for entering the ticket giveaway is 7:00pm pacific time on February 6, 2019. The giveaway is open to residents of Canada and the United States. I will have Farmer Jim draw a winner for the pair of tickets to the show and winners will be notified the next day.

Hop on over and join the conversations  at  That Bloomin’ Garden Facebook.

 

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